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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:12 pm 
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As fate would have it, Pixar was bought by Disney in 2006 and Lasseter once again found himself as an employee of the animation giant and overseeing the company's 2D division.

The likes of Bolt, Tangled, Wreck-it-Ralph and the ever-popular Frozen proves there's still life in hand-drawn animation - as long as someone such as John Lasseter is at the helm.
Source: http://www.techradar.com/news/world-of- ... er-1295571


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:43 pm 
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Sotiris wrote:
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As fate would have it, Pixar was bought by Disney in 2006 and Lasseter once again found himself as an employee of the animation giant and overseeing the company's 2D division.

The likes of Bolt, Tangled, Wreck-it-Ralph and the ever-popular Frozen proves there's still life in hand-drawn animation - as long as someone such as John Lasseter is at the helm.
Source: http://www.techradar.com/news/world-of- ... er-1295571


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:52 pm 
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Sotiris wrote:
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As fate would have it, Pixar was bought by Disney in 2006 and Lasseter once again found himself as an employee of the animation giant and overseeing the company's 2D division.

The likes of Bolt, Tangled, Wreck-it-Ralph and the ever-popular Frozen proves there's still life in hand-drawn animation - as long as someone such as John Lasseter is at the helm.
Source: http://www.techradar.com/news/world-of- ... er-1295571


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That's a laugh. :roll:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 12:02 am 
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Sotiris wrote:
We now get a new "reason" why Disney isn't doing 2D anymore. :roll: I wonder what else they'll come up with.

Patrick Osborne wrote:
Directing in 3D is much more interactive, and the footage is much more polishable. There’s a lot of notes that you can make that are not worth completely destroying the footage you have. In 2D, acting on a lot of notes would mean redrawing the sequence again from scratch. I like the idea of honing a performance through several different iterations, and that’s the way we work in 3D. It’s very easy to make nudges to the animation, starting broad and the refining, but in 2D it would just have to be “Well, you’ve got to draw it all again to take my note.”
Source: http://www.filmdivider.com/9085/an-anim ... eys-feast/


The following gif sums up my thoughts on this "reason."


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 6:12 am 
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I think the characters in Frozen and Tangled look like bugs. Moving in slowmotion.
I also think "tangibility" in animation is a bad thing. Animation should not look like real material. Then it ends up looking like Chucky from Child's Play (Rapunzel).

To me it is still more like the "Betty Boop" standard, and not at all yet the "Snow White" standard yet, in terms of design and motion.

It is strange, because the concept art always looks promising, and the actual film ends up looking like bugs.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 12:19 pm 
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eww Chucky's GF has little human like fingernails? eeewww!

I agree that so far in most Hollywood CGI films the characters looks more like dolls. Even in the Peanuts & Popeye CGI films(which I think got canceled right?) where they were attempting for something more natural/flatter looking, they still look like dolls(though more like stop motion or clay figures.)

LOL at that article's major error.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 1:22 pm 
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DisneyJedi wrote:
Sotiris wrote:
We now get a new "reason" why Disney isn't doing 2D anymore. :roll: I wonder what else they'll come up with.

Patrick Osborne wrote:
Directing in 3D is much more interactive, and the footage is much more polishable. There’s a lot of notes that you can make that are not worth completely destroying the footage you have. In 2D, acting on a lot of notes would mean redrawing the sequence again from scratch. I like the idea of honing a performance through several different iterations, and that’s the way we work in 3D. It’s very easy to make nudges to the animation, starting broad and the refining, but in 2D it would just have to be “Well, you’ve got to draw it all again to take my note.”
Source: http://www.filmdivider.com/9085/an-anim ... eys-feast/


The following gif sums up my thoughts on this "reason."

Every single thing in that quote is true, I don't know why you're acting like its not. Its just the nature of the medium and is a big part of why its not as widely done anymore.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 3:27 pm 
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Marky_198 wrote:
I think the characters in Frozen and Tangled look like bugs. Moving in slowmotion.
I also think "tangibility" in animation is a bad thing. Animation should not look like real material. Then it ends up looking like Chucky from Child's Play (Rapunzel).

To me it is still more like the "Betty Boop" standard, and not at all yet the "Snow White" standard yet, in terms of design and motion.

It is strange, because the concept art always looks promising, and the actual film ends up looking like bugs.


Even Tiana as a frog looked more adorable than Disney's newest princesses do in CGI.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 4:32 pm 
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2Disney4Ever wrote:
Even Tiana as a frog looked more adorable than Disney's newest princesses do in CGI.

Disagree. I thought Tiana's frog design was generic and lackluster, compared to her human design. And yes, although you are comparing Tiana's frog design to the newest CGI princesses, I wouldn't take that comparison. No offense, though.

I wasn't impressed by Rapunzel's design to begin with, but it grew on me. At least she looks typically "Disney" in CGI, as does the rest of the cast. The designs in "Frozen" are really lackluster. Elsa looks like she could've starred in the Pixie Hollow franchise. And Anna looks like she could've been in another studio. And not to mention the generic designs of both Kristoff and Hans!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:04 pm 
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Well, Kyle, I was referring to the fact that they were making one of the lamest excuses not to make hand drawn animations


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:53 pm 
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Disney animator Andrew Chesworth posted the opening sequence of an indie short film he was working on called "The Brave Locomotive". You can find concept art for his short, here.



Andrew Chesworth wrote:
This is the opening sequence to a musical short film I developed independently in 2008 at the age of 23. It was conceived as a love letter to 1940s postwar Disney animation as well as the musical stylings of the Andrews Sisters. The music was composed by Tom Hambleton at Undertone Music in Minneapolis.

Animated in my spare time between 2009 and 2011, the project was shelved when I got hired at Disney Animation in the fall of 2011. The entire six minute film exists as a story reel with completed songs, but only this opening sequence made it to animation production. Many of the shots are missing effects, still have rough layout stand-ins, or didn’t make it to cleanup.

The project sat dormant from 2012-2015 while I animated on several Disney feature films. I recently made the difficult decision to cancel the project and retire the incomplete animation online. It is the creative authorship of a much younger filmmaker and its time has passed. I learned a great deal from this project and I’m eternally grateful for the insight, feedback, and contributions of everyone who helped me during its development.
Source: http://artofandrewchesworth.tumblr.com/ ... ical-short

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:56 pm 
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Kyle wrote:
Every single thing in that quote is true, I don't know why you're acting like its not. Its just the nature of the medium and is a big part of why its not as widely done anymore.

I agree, everything is true. But it's still just an excuse for 3D animators' bias and executive meddling, since hand-drawn obviously managed fine for nearly a century. And, more importantly, they talk about 2D only in negatives, as if 2D doesn't also have its many benefits over 3D.

DisneyFan09 wrote:
The designs in "Frozen" are really lackluster.

Sorry, but I'll have to really disagree with you there. Elsa, Anna, and Rapunzel are all varying degrees of Ariel, but at least Anna/Elsa have nice outfits.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2015 12:38 pm 
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Sorry, but I'll have to really disagree with you there. Elsa, Anna, and Rapunzel are all varying degrees of Ariel, but at least Anna/Elsa have nice outfits.

You have such a horrible taste. I'll never be able to type to you again.

Kidding ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2015 2:38 pm 
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the Chesworth clip was adorable. Loved it!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2015 3:45 am 
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unprincess wrote:
There's also this that might be coming from South Africa:
http://www.cartoonbrew.com/feature-film ... 13129.html


The director pitched the project at Annecy and revealed more information about it in a new interview.

Annecy: Modern African Fairy Tale ‘Kariba’ Explores Diversity in Animation
http://variety.com/2015/film/festivals/ ... 201522921/


They've also crowd-funded a graphic novel to help raise awareness and funds for the film.

Dam big animation project
http://www.iol.co.za/weekend-argus/dam- ... ct-1996828

Local graphic novel seeks $20k on Kickstarter
http://www.itweb.co.za/index.php?option ... &id=150374

Studio Ghibli Storytelling Inspires a South African Graphic Novel
http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog ... phic-novel

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:08 pm 
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^ I so hope this gets made into a feature film. Wish the crew the best of luck!

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2015 5:18 am 
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Roger Allers talks about how he was forced to make the framing story in The Prophet in CG because it was cheaper and faster.

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We started off doing it 2D, hand-animated, because they asked me what I would like to do and I thought I would love to do that again. So we started off doing that with a company based in Canada but got into trouble. We got behind schedule and over budget and knew we couldn't finish the movie within the parameters that we were contracted to do. So we shifted gears to do it CG to get it done on time and on budget. So that was a hard transition because we did not change the style. we were still going to use all the same backgrounds that had been created. So we achieved a different technique to achieve the same look and that was tricky trying to build CG models that could look like the graphic ones. But this toon shading is something I had not been familiar with before so that was also another leap of faith in how it was going to look. I approve the animation in the 3D model form and then it would go through this toon shading process where it would get flattened out and the program would delineate the edges with line work.
Source: http://blogs.indiewire.com/animationsco ... t-20150615

Quote:
This central storyline is brought to life through the unexpected combination of CG animated characters and watercolor backdrops – a solution to a time crunch that nearly derailed the film entirely. “We discovered that we were in trouble in terms of getting everything finished and on budget,” Allers explains. “It was pretty scary.” Though the original intent had been to use hand-drawn animation throughout, Allers realized too late that, as he puts it, “there wasn’t enough of it that was done, which was why we got into trouble. Part of that was just because of the realities of the way they had organized it. It was mostly done through people throughout the world and it just wasn’t happening quickly enough.”

With no way to get the international backers to agree to extend the two-year production schedule, the director passed some of the hand-drawn work over to CG animators and tried to find a happy medium. “I did not want to change the style of the movie and neither did anyone else,” Allers continues. “Then, someone at Bardel in Vancouver – the studio that did all the animation of this new iteration – suggested Toon Shading, which is a process by which the CG animation is flattened back out and then the computer recognizes the edges and assigns them a line rather than shading them. After seeing an example, we thought it could work so we went for it. It was a leap of faith.”
Source: http://www.awn.com/animationworld/fanta ... -s-prophet

Quote:
He chose a traditional 2D approach and worked with the Brizzis, who storyboarded Allers’ segments in addition to directing their own segment in the film. Allers worked remotely via Skype with both his crew and with the other animators. The animation was done at Bardel Entertainment in Vancouver, with CG technology used to complete the film within the limits of its schedule and budget.

“We started off doing it as a hand-drawn film with hand-painted backgrounds, basically. We kept the style, we kept the backgrounds but we shipped it to CG because of the time constraint and reinterpreted all these graphic character designs into 3D models,” Allers says. “And then it went through a process called toon shading where we would flatten them back out after they were animated and then have traditional animators go over that as well and refine and embellish. It was a very strange, hybrid technique and it was risky because none of us knew how it was going to turn out as well as it did it.”
Source: http://www.animationmagazine.net/featur ... ts-united/

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The next step was to create a visually lush film. Originally, the plan was to create it wholly in 2D, but due to budgetary and time constraints, the Bardel team opted to create a 3D technology that compressed the imagery, giving the film a 2D look and feel. “[The] challenge was to create 3D models that could flatten to become the 2D graphic we had originally,” said Allers. “We created a program to cast light on models and [the artists] hand-drew where the characters should be,” said Bhesania. For the final step, the 2D artists finessed the lines of the characters and backgrounds using TV Paint.
Source: http://www.animationmagazine.net/events ... e-prophet/

Nik Ranieri wrote:
Usually when people talk about doing a hand-drawn film, the investors go “I guess we could put some money into it but it will have to go to Korea.” This was the problem with The Prophet. Roger Allers wanted to do The Prophet in hand-drawn, and there are some hand-drawn scenes in the film, but the production company and the investors were like “This has to get done right away” but they didn’t set up a pipeline for 2D. So, they had to choose between Korea or CG toon-shade which is what they ultimately chose.
Source: http://taughtbyapro.com/podcast-33-what ... k-ranieri/

Quote:
Q: What are your feelings about computer-generated animation vs. traditional hand-drawn animation?

Roger Allers: Each is similar but so different. I hope each have a chance to evolve. They use slightly different parts of the brain and body and each deserves a place before the eyes of the world audience.
Source: http://variety.com/2016/film/awards/dir ... 201678468/

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 5:08 pm 
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Matt Maners who worked on The Princess and the Frog as an effects animator says that the production budget for the film was $70 million and not $105 million as reported by Box Office Mojo. Previously, an anonymous commenter who claimed they worked on the film said it cost only $65 million: "I worked on PATF and while I was there we were told the budget was $65 million and we came in under budget as well."

Matt Maners wrote:
Iron Giant was done for $57 million, Princess and the Frog for $70 million. Don't believe what you may have read on Box Office Mojo; I worked on both of those films and those are the figures. Oh and PATF was not outsourced to Mexico, some was sent to Yazow in Canada but the majority was done in house at Disney by an amazing team.
Source: http://www.cartoonbrew.com/animators/br ... 2042446553

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 5:54 pm 
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Apparently, Pixar is also having 2D animators help out on their films with draw-overs now. I've got a question though: if CG animation is supposedly the "superior" medium, why do studios always need 2D animators to improve their CG animation?

Quote:
Tony Fucile, whose credits include Disney’s “The Lion King” and “Aladdin,” served as an animation sketch artist for the film. He was tasked with bringing the best of hand-drawn animation to the CG film. Fucile attended animation dailies and often provided his notes as actual draw-overs that could be captured and provided to the animator. “I worked with the animation team to juice up the poses a little bit,” says Fucile. “I like to push the poses or expressions a little further—rarely will I ever suggest to pull it back.”

“All of the Emotions are the most cartoony, most stylized characters that we’ve ever attempted in a feature film here at Pixar,” says supervising animator Victor Navone. “They are the kind of characters that might actually be easier to draw on paper—but they’re really hard to do in three dimensions. These characters are so special, so unique—we just wanted to hit a home run.”
Source: http://www.thebeardedtrio.com/2015/06/p ... notes.html

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When an animator shares a particular scene they are working on, story artist Tony Fucile with sometimes do “draw overs”. These help the animators address notes from the film’s director, Pete Docter. It is kinda of like using a piece of transparency film over the top of a piece of art. The notes and drawings are all there, but the original is still in tact — it is just all done digitally. It is really fun to see how minor changes like increasing the arch of eyebrows, or softening an expression can have such a big impact on a scene.
Source: http://mommybunch.com/get-animated-with ... nside-out/

Quote:
One way that changes are made (beyond verbal notes) is by Story Artist Tony Fucile who will do what’s called “draw overs” by using an overhead projector type unit, he is able draw over the image on the screen making visual notes for the animators, from tweaks in movements or adjustments in facial expressions. Fucile also had a special tool to assist him in his notes – a mirror. During the sessions he would place the mirror in a place where he would be able to see Pete Docter’s face and gestures, which would be quite animated, and use his mannerisms as reference.
Source: http://www.wonderandcompany.com/inside- ... r-studios/

Quote:
But for the interior scenes, with Joy, Sadness, Anger and the rest, the approach was completely different. For those, the great animator Tony Fucile – a key figure in the Disney Renaissance of the Nineties, and a lead artist on The Little Mermaid, Aladdin and The Lion King – sketched the characters entirely freehand, using the “rushes”, or basic, first-draft versions of scenes, as backdrops. Fucile’s drawings were then used to refine the characters’ expressions and movements – and for extra guidance, he also ran weekly seminars in which he picked apart classic Looney Tunes and MGM cartoons frame by frame, so that Pixar’s younger animators might better understand the form’s capacity for energy and play.

Officially, this makes Inside Out the first Pixar feature to use the art-form the studio almost accidentally extinguished, and the difference is as unmistakable as it is indefinable. Jonas Rivera, Inside Out’s producer and a seasoned Pixar-ite since the Toy Story days (he joined as the studio’s first intern), describes it as “that feel… that magic trick that loosens things up a little bit”.
Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/film/inside- ... interview/

Quote:
Much inspiration came from classic mid-20th century animation: the work of Tex Avery and Chuck Jones, and classic Disney. "Seeing the early character designs," says animator Victor Navone, "I thought, 'Wow, that's much more cartoony and stylised than anything we've done before - we have to up our game." To do that, they went back to the drawing board, bringing in artist and animator Tony Fucile, who worked on Bugs Bunny and Tom and Jerry cartoons in the 80s and 90s, as well as The Little Mermaid, The Lion King and Ratatouille. "As our sketch artist, Tony gave us that level of hand-drawn design so we knew where to push it to," says Navone.

Fucile drew over the top of the computer-generated works in progress. "Pete was after a sense of draughtsmanship," says Rivera. "And Tony's an amazing hand-drawn animator. We knew we could make it feel physically correct but we wanted to go further than that, push the curves and stretch out the limbs, really have impact. So as Pete was directing the animators, Tony would draw right over the shot, and we hopefully retained some of that. In 101 Dalmatians and Robin Hood, where you feel the drawing... that's impossible to do in our medium, because it's a [computer] model, but drawing over it helped loosen it."
Source: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/201 ... inside-out

Quote:
Q: Tony Fucile was much involved in this movie. What did he bring to your department, as he was a noted 2D animator?

Victor Navone: We call Tony a “triple threat,” because he can do storyboarding, character design, and animation, and do them all really well. He was a savior on this film, and really helped us push the quality of our animation further than ever. He brought a hand-drawn aesthetic to our animation that we had been craving, and we all felt like we were in school again when we would see his drawings on our shots. Once or twice a month we would have “Tony Time,” where the animators would join him in a screening room and he would go over someone’s shot live, or analyze a piece of classic 2D animation. It was very inspiring! I rarely asked Tony to help me plan a shot, but once I had some blocking I was always asking him how to improve it. Tony is very timid about offering his own ideas, but is great at pushing others’ ideas to be clearer and more entertaining. You had to really twist his arm to get him to suggest a new idea. I would often ask him, “how would you animate this, Tony?!”
Source: http://animatedviews.com/2015/inside-an ... ones-mind/

Quote:
Q: Can you tell me about Tony [Fucile]’s position? You mentioned that that’s a new one during the presentation. Did he just come on for Inside Out or is that a permanent position you guys would like to incorporate when making future films?

Shawn Krause: It kind of came about because we were talking about movies we loved and one of them was Tangled, and there was a level of appeal they got to on that film. Glen Keane was the co-director on that, and he would draw over all these drawings. I think he said he even did more drawings on that film than he did on Tarzan, which is crazy. So as we were thinking, ‘how are were gonna get that level’ – not that we couldn’t already with our team – but how are we going to ensure this? We were thinking, well, there’s a level of 2D history that Glen had that we’d love to be able to reinforce at this studio. Tony was around and he was already helping out on the film …

Victor Navone: Although Tony came back to the studio. He was on break doing children’s books, but when he found out about this film, he really wanted to work on it. And he also worked in story and art, and we were lucky enough to be able to grab him for animation as soon as he was done in story and art, and it just worked out beautifully. But it’s the first time we’ve had the full time role for that, like you said, and although it won’t always be him, I think it’s gonna be something we have on all our films from here out.

Shawn Krause: And while we already incorporate as many of the principles of animation as we can, the way you think about animation in 2D – spacing of every frame – a lot of things are automated once we set key poses down. It sort of forces creative decisions beyond what’s given to us, and it’s challenging sometimes. So Tony brought that graphic style, brought that 2D sensibility and filled in the holes where maybe we can improve. And someone with his pedigree to come in, with his history and his respect, no one questioned it.

Victor Navone: Because Tony worked on Iron Giant, he worked on Lion King, Little Mermaid. He’s a wonderful 2D animator.

Shawn Krause: Family Dog.

Q: Is that one of the first people you’ve seen that’s come in with a 2D mindset?

Victor Navone: No, actually. We’ve hired plenty of animators with 2D backgrounds. In fact, we’ve even hired animators who never touched the computer before they got here.

Shawn Krause: Originally, most of us back 20 years ago, were trained 2D first and then you’d learn the computer.

Victor Navone: It’s a lot easier to teach someone how to use a computer than it is to teach someone how to be an artist, so we figured if they can animate with a pencil, we can teach them how to animate with a computer.
Source: http://collider.com/inside-out-supervis ... interview/


Pete Docter talks about 2D animation and admits that Disney has given up on the medium.

Quote:
Q: Then I was reading about the work Tony Fucile did on the project, serving as an animation sketch artist and bringing hand-drawn animation to the film. The industry has obviously gone away from hand-drawn, so how do you see the marriage of those two and what are the limitations of one versus the other that, in this case keeps hand-drawn animation alive even if the audience might not know it.

Pete Docter: As we came up with this idea I began thinking about how caricature, like if you look at Al Hirschfeld or any of these caricature artists, if they're really good they can sometimes make a person look more like them than a photograph because they're distilling out anything nonessential to that likeness., they're focusing in on the big nose or whatever it is. Movement, I think, can do that as well and animation can really embody that.

[We at Pixar], from our history, approached things almost scientifically. Of course we all came from hand-drawn, but I think on Toy Story, just for example, as we were building Buzz's face or some of the humans, we looked at musculature, human musculature, just to understand how the sub-orbital and the smile muscle connects here, and pulls that way, etc. So we were thinking pretty realistically. On this film, because it was about emotions, we thought, "Man, we can throw the ball the other way. We can go look at all the great stuff we grew up on -- Tex Avery and Chuck Jones." So, Tony is such a great artist, he has an instinctive sense, sometimes when you're drawing I don't think you can fully explain why you're doing something, it just kind of comes out of the pencil, and only later can you say, "Of course, I'm breaking the elbow in a way that it couldn't just to emphasize the stretch or the intention of the pose."

So he would draw over almost every scene, breaking down key poses and push things further, especially in the emotions.

Jonas Rivera: Yeah, we have a Cintiq that you can draw on as the shot is looping and people can pause it on a frame and start talking and Tony would start drawing over it. You can just see it --

Pete Docter: --getting stronger, yeah.

Q: So that obviously influences the CG animation.

Pete Docter: Yeah, so the animators then take those drawings back to their desk and even though it wouldn't instinctively occur to them to dislocate the shoulder, they can do that just to get the necessary stretch, to really exaggerate things.

Q: So would this movie work as a 2D, hand-drawn animated feature?

Pete Docter: Yeah, I think it could.

Q: So why have we lost that? Is it a matter of audiences are just used to the new thing now and they wouldn't show up to watch a hand-drawn feature?

Jonas Rivera: Character animation-wise, the movie would work beautifully in 2D, but one of the things I like is we've got these dimensional screens and memories in space that I really think benefit from CG. Having applied space, I love having that screen and that shot-within-a-shot. I think in 2D that might not be as lush.

Pete Docter: Yeah, that's true, but the idea would still be there and there would probably be other advantages to 2D that we didn't even get in 3D, but you're right there is a dimensionality, a lushness and textural things that you don't get in 2D.
Source: http://www.ropeofsilicon.com/inside-pix ... -docter/2/

Quote:
Q: I know you're a fan of Japan's animation powerhouse Studio Ghibli and its co-founder Hayao Miyazaki, who retired relatively recently. Do you think there will still be room – or a desire for – old-school, hand-drawn cel animation of that sort in the future? Or will a generation that has grown up with mainly digital animation at their local cineplex find that too old-school, or not "realistic" enough?

Pete Docter: Oh, man, I hope not. I love it. But I have no idea. For me, personally, it still speaks loud and clear. There's something about that fact that a person made these marks that express so much. In [the Studio Ghibli film] The Tale of Princess Kaguya there's this scene where she runs away and there's just this, wow, element of "I can just feel that." It's so good! And I don't know that we can ever get that with CG. I mean, we can do other things better than hand-drawing can do, but there are definitely things that hand-drawing can do better than CG. I gotta say that when I talk to young artists, there are a lot that say, and now more than ever, that they're really into anime and love what it brings to their lives for whatever reason. So I hope that [hand-drawn animation] is going to stay around in some way. But who knows? Fifteen years ago, I would have said that the 2-D animation that Disney was doing would have stayed around, too. It hasn't, but maybe it'll come back.
Source: http://www.austinchronicle.com/screens/ ... e-message/

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2015 1:40 pm 
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its funny isnt it? To make their CGI characters look better, they have to hire traditional animators to draw over their models...instead of just making the movie traditionally hand drawn in the first place.

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