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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 11:12 pm 
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PatrickvD wrote:
Really Disney?

I'm pretty sure the academy would nominate a Zooey Deschanel song over Lady Gaga any day of the week. Stop advertising for Gnomeo and just go all out for Pooh, it's the only good movie they released this year.

You're personal preference. Nothing wrong with promoting all their films under their belt this year in order to secure some nomination.

You could just as easily say the academy would nominate Elton John over Zooey Deshanel anyday.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 2:46 pm 
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Doesn't anybody find ironic that the movie John Lasseter got rid off has a better chance to be nominated, if only because Elton John composed the music, while the movie Lasseter directed was critically panned and there's little chance that it can get a nomination?

The competition is really strong this year, something that makes me very happy, it's great to see the animation industry like this, but considering that both Disney and Pixar films are rather weak compared to the others, I really don't think they'll get a nomination this time.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 4:10 pm 
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I personally think with its high amount of respect from animators and its 91% Rotten Tomatoes rating, that Winnie the Pooh is the second most-likely to get a nomination after Rango.

Either Arthur Christmas, Rio, The Adventures of Tintin, Kung Fu Panda 2, Puss in Boots or Chico & Rita will get the other three spots. And if Tintin manages to get in, despite being motion-capture, it will definitely win.

Happy Feet Two is getting a mostly negative reception, so its chances just went down a lot (a shame, too, since I thought it was pretty good and maybe even slightly better than the first).

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 5:32 pm 
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So far I really want either Panda or Pooh to win. I've seen most of the animated movies released so far, nothing foreign yet, and honestly and wholeheartedly believe these two are the best of the bunch.

As for Rango, I don't know, I didn't like it all that much. Animation was great and it had a interesting story, but I felt it failed in execution. The movie took to long to pick up and I mean really long (try the last 20mins). The humor felt really forced. It was as if they were trying to be funny and weird for the sack of some cheap laughs.

Whereas Panda and Pooh also have gorgeous animation and a level of sophistication in their humor. Also Panda did some really neat things with its directing. The use of 2D animation to tell the past of Po was a brilliant directing choice.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:31 pm 
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I think this year should go to Rango. Cars 2 shouldn't even be nominated.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:44 pm 
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More FYC Disney ads, for Winnie the Pooh:

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And for Cars 2:

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:53 pm 
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estefan wrote:
More FYC Disney ads, for Winnie the Pooh.


Thanks! If you happen to find more, please don't hesitate to share.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:24 am 
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A lot of submitted films are in danger of being disqualified.

If 0-2 films get disqualified, we'll have 5 nominees.
If 3-5 films get disqualified, we'll have 4 nominees.
If more that 5 films get disqualified, we'll only get 3 nominees.

The submitted films in danger of being disqualified are:

-the CG/live-action hybrids: "The Smurfs", "Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked"

-the motion/performance-capture films: "The Adventures of Tintin", "Happy Feet Two", "Mars Needs Moms"

-the rotoscoped films: "Alois Nebel", "Chico & Rita"


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The animated feature category is now a decade old, and in that time, the category has served up three nominees in all but two of its previous 10 years, when the number of eligible submissions was great enough to expand the ballot to five slots.

Last year nearly made the cut, until CG/live-action hybrid "Yogi Bear" was disqualified, leaving Golden Globe nominees "Despicable Me" and "Tangled" unrecognized by Oscar.

"What a shame that because we were short one film, we lost two nominees," says Academy governor Bill Kroyer, who serves on the short films and feature animation branch.

That's why the org decided to instate an intermediary threshold. If 12 or fewer toons qualify, the race stays small (at three noms), but if 13 or more toons receive theatrical release, the category expands to four noms. And if 16 or more open, there can be five.

From the 18 submitted films, the prognosticators will start to examine which ones might be disqualified the way "Yogi Bear" was last year. At risk, "The Smurfs" and "Alvin" rely heavily on live-action footage, foreign submissions "Alois nebel" and "Chico & Rita" use a fair amount of rotoscoping (a technique akin to tracing live-action footage), and "Mars Needs Moms," "The Adventures of Tintin" and "Happy Feet Two" blend motion-capture with the keyframe style the Academy prefers.

"We're trying to preserve the animation process as a performance art, not a visual effects art," says Kroyer, whose own CV involves both "traditional" animation and performance-capture experience.

That said, the Academy is generous in its definition: "Every artist from Picasso to Vermeer has used live models, but you look at a Picasso and think, 'That's real art,' and you look at a Vermeer and say, 'Man, he could have taken a photograph and achieved the same effect,'?" notes Kroyer.

In other words, the Academy aims to recognize performances created by animators, not flesh-and-blood actors. To make that determination, the Academy relies on "the word of the filmmaker," Kroyer says. This year, since Spielberg believes animators were integral to "Tintin," (he claims that it's 85% animation), the film should be considered eligible and becomes a formidable contender in the Oscar toon race.


Source: http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118045826/


If it's just the "word of the filmmaker" that the Academy takes into account, and there's no real research and investigation, wouldn't all filmmakers lie so their films will be deemed eligible? Just taking their word for it is absurd!

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:40 am 
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Smurfs and Chipmunks should never have been qualified for this category to begin with. I don't see how when the majority of both of their films is live action.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 11:51 am 
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I agree with toonaspie. Smurfs and AatC don't even count as animated films.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 4:53 pm 
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Spielberg, Tintin, and the Race for the Oscar
http://blogs.indiewire.com/thompsononho ... -for-oscar

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According to an Academy governor that I spoke with a year ago, the concern is that technology will make the craft of animation obsolete -- an automated pass through, so to speak. That's why they've added the "frame-by-frame" caveat in defining animation. But they're not even close to fully automating capture/render. Thus, performance capture merely gives you a more sophisticated framework from which to start, allowing the animators more time to bring it to life, frame-by-frame.

"You're still playing the truth of the character, whether it's rendered finally as a more animated visual style or photoreal," suggests Serkis. "If you're saying Tintin isn't animation, then what does that say about voice actors that come along and stand in a booth for a few hours and deliver lines? This was not the case: we shot it like a movie."

Or, as Disney's hand-drawn vet Eric Goldberg ("Winnie the Pooh") observes, "MoCap is a tool in the same way that rotoscope was a tool. It's how you use it. It's as little or as much as the filmmakers want. Hell, the Fleischers invented rotoscope, and you can't tell me that Koco the Clown or the dance in Snow White isn't animation. Of course it's animation!"

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 10:59 am 
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Leeds Film Festival to Become Qualifying Event for the Oscars
http://www.screendaily.com/festivals/le ... 61.article

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 11:24 pm 
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Is Spielberg kidding us? First he says The Adventures of Tintin is 85% animated and now he's saying it's 100% animated? :roll:

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 5:31 am 
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He's just promoting his film that's all.

The most important thing, the faces, are NOT animated. The expression of the face is such an important thing because an animator really makes something unequal his in this aspect. We're just watching Jamie Bell and Daniel Craig act... with some CGI sprinkled on top.

Yuck.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:37 am 
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Wow, I never expected Spielberg to be a Family Guy fan. Ever.

I love that he mentioned the shows he produced in the '90s. Spielberg really needs to get back into that game.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:15 am 
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PatrickvD wrote:
He's just promoting his film that's all.

The most important thing, the faces, are NOT animated. The expression of the face is such an important thing because an animator really makes something unequal his in this aspect. We're just watching Jamie Bell and Daniel Craig act... with some CGI sprinkled on top.

Yuck.


that´s not the only problem... the worst thing is that the faces expressions and their "performance" are dull and empty. Disney or pixar characters are much more better than these!!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:28 pm 
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estefan wrote:
Wow, I never expected Spielberg to be a Family Guy fan. Ever.

I love that he mentioned the shows he produced in the '90s. Spielberg really needs to get back into that game.


He's just saying he likes Family Guy. Let's get real here, he just randomly blurts out everything he ever did with animation in a 'see, I know animation' kind of way. Family Guy and its creators at FOX animation form a big team of animators and potential voters for him. As if he gives a crap about that show. They've made fun of him just like South Park has.

He forgot to mention abominations like Casper, We're Back! A Dinosaur Story and Balto. He slaps 'producer' on so many projects it's easy to single out the ones that are great like The Animaniacs and take credit for it, ignoring the mountains of crap.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:59 pm 
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PatrickvD wrote:
He forgot to mention abominations like Casper, We're Back! A Dinosaur Story and Balto. He slaps 'producer' on so many projects it's easy to single out the ones that are great like The Animaniacs and take credit for it, ignoring the mountains of crap.
Balto is an "abomination"? :? Really?

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 8:45 pm 
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The issue with mo-cap and whether it's animation or live-action is getting ridiculous. While Spielberg is trying to convince us that it's animation, at the same time Andy Serkis and Fox are trying to convince us that it's live-action. :roll:

Quote:
Fox's campaign for Serkis will test Oscar voters' willingness to acknowledge actors' work in the increasingly common performance capture field, in which the actions of human actors are recorded and used to animate digital character models. "Our job is to try to have people be aware of and recognize great performances, even when they come in this case in an unusual skin," said Tom Rothman, co-chairman and CEO of Fox Filmed Entertainment. "I think it's one of the great emotional performances ever. The challenge is to overcome preconceptions and certain prejudices, to have people understand that … the emotionality of the character on screen is not provided by the animators, it's provided by the actor."

For Serkis' campaign, Fox will hold screenings at the Screen Actors Guild and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The studio will also make materials available in "for your consideration" ads showing how Serkis' performance in "Apes" looked before the artists at Weta enhanced it. Serkis also appears in another high-profile performance capture role this year as seafaring sidekick Captain Haddock in Steven Spielberg's "The Adventures of Tintin," which opens in the U.S. in December. Paramount is campaigning that movie as an animated film in the awards race, and so far has not revealed any major push for its actors.

If there is increasing acceptance of performance capture in Hollywood, that's largely due to the work of a few tall, blue aliens, according to Woody Schultz, chairman of the Screen Actors Guild's Performance Capture Committee, which formed in 2010 in the wake of the questions the guild's members had about "Avatar." (Serkis' work is also eligible for a SAG award, which the guild confers in January. Neither SAG nor the academy has a special category for performance capture acting, although at one point "Polar Express" director Robert Zemeckis pushed for the academy to create one).


Source: http://theenvelope.latimes.com/news/la- ... 6559.story



At first the Academy accepted mo-cap films as animated; then they formed new additional rules to clarify mo-cap as distinct from animation to satisfy James Cameron who pushed for this. Now that another big Hollywood honcho like Spielberg tells them it's animation they're going along with it again.

It just seems that there is no objectivity and no real desire in actually examining the performance capture process and revealing how much of it is involves animation and how much of it involves live-action. Especially since the Academy is reportedly just taking "the filmmaker's word" for it without demanding proof of records and data when ruling whether a mo-cap film is eligible in the animation category.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:32 am 
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Disney's Divinity wrote:
PatrickvD wrote:
He forgot to mention abominations like Casper, We're Back! A Dinosaur Story and Balto. He slaps 'producer' on so many projects it's easy to single out the ones that are great like The Animaniacs and take credit for it, ignoring the mountains of crap.
Balto is an "abomination"? :? Really?


Just saw Balto again four days ago. It's no gold or even silver winning feature, but it's no abomination. Hey, I even live in Alaska and can see/pick at all the story inaccuracies.

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