DVDizzy.com

Home | Reviews | Schedule | Cover Art | Search The Site
DVDizzy.com Top Stories:

It is currently Mon Jul 28, 2014 6:32 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 63 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Review A CD Thread
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:21 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 3:43 pm
Posts: 4553
Location: USA
In this thead, we can review CDs! We often review movies in the What Movie Did You Just Watch threads and tv shows in the What Complete Season Did You Just Watch thread.

We don't, however, have anywhere to discuss CDs!

Go for it!

_________________
Image

http://teendramaforum.proboards.com/
http://twitter.com/clemxens


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:02 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:28 am
Posts: 2517
U2 - The Joshua Tree






Best album of all time.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:15 pm 
Offline
Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:35 am
Posts: 8296
Location: Shock and Awe Gender: Freakazoid
Thank God for not having to buy these things to hear them online:

Image

Image

Okay, this Ke$ha act is... in the eyes of some, the 'new' Lady Gaga. Presuming that Lady Gaga was ever a "flavor of the moment" and her moment has passed. She's also being compared to or placed in the slot of Katy Perry or Lily Allen. None of these comparisons work. Other than that she's riding on the most popular kind of music as these other women did when they were in the spotlight- club music turned pop. I hope that makes sense because if I have to map it out in details, it's going to sound crazy. Here goes anyway: some club acts just go friggin' crazy on their tracks. LMFAO, for example. They are all about the club and club mood. None of the women I've just mentioned, including Ke$ha, make that kind of music. At some point, they feel the need to try to find a soul on their albums. To do a ballad. To make an emotional connection with their listeners. Ke$ha wants to be some kind of punk. Like a more Avril Lavigne version of Lady Gaga. Instead, her reputation has caused her to come off more like a younger, blonde Amy Winehouse. A cold, smelly mess. And lyrics about puking certainly don't do her any favors.

Anyone can make a great brainless club anthem. All it takes is an amazing producer. There are many of them right now in pop / electro-whatever. They breed like flies in this era of The Lady Gaga. When she's not releasing at least an 8-track CD, there's a space for a Ke$ha to come in and make a lot of noise. It doesn't take long to make an impression. Hell, Ke$ha's "Dinosaur" (one of the best songs on Animal) makes an impression all its' own, as though there wasn't a human attached to it in any way. I wasn't sure it was charming but it did make an impression. I first decided to peek my head into Ke$ha's room when Yahoo! Music (because I roll mainstream-media) said she was about to dethrone Lady Gaga with "TiK ToK." I said, "I've got a moment- I'll check it out." No, it's not up to Lady Gaga's standards. It's of a different species. Wholly disposable radio pop tunes. But well done for a follower. I recognize that about "TiK ToK" now. It becomes hugely apparent after you get to track #3 on the CD. It doesn't take long for this girl to unravel. And she does. By betraying the club-slut / permanent drunk stereotype and trying to prove she can be more radio friendly.

That's an unwise move because she has a very unique voice. One that only feels at home on the sleazy, brainless club songs. Lady Gaga barely does ballads but like Katy Perry's "Ur So Gay," she seems to have a special, one-of-a-kind perspective on pop songs with a dramatic feel to them. Though in Perry's case, it's a sense of freak-eyed humor (her eyes are freaky - watch the video again, it couldn't have just been the clouds) (wait... maybe it's her smile that's freaky). Despite "TiK ToK" being our first impression of her, Ke$ha pulls off the wildly high-pitched chorus of "Your Love is My Drug" admirably. That's as broad as she can get. And that song should not have been #1 on the CD. The rest of her more pop tracks are awkward failures. And only get good the more brainless they are. Especially "Blah Blah Blah" and "Dinosaur." It's almost as though she senses that her shelf life is limited due to how she can make a name for herself only as long as "TiK ToK" sounds fresh. So, why doesn't she quickly start addressing the haters via "Backstabber" and "Kiss N Tell"? We don't even know who she is. And thanks to a track as unforgettably awful as "Take It Off"... I don't think I want to get to know her either.

Basically, her raps take advantage of her rather sickly voice and the less crazed club tracks try to make up for it. As in- anyone could be singing this song as well as she is. But her raps compliment the nasty lyrics, because her rapping voice is quite appealing. Especially, again, on "Dinosaur." In case you haven't heard of it, it's a song about a girl (Ke$ha) insulting a man hitting on her in a club because she thinks he's too old for her. This track could be fuller. But naturally, with it being called "Dinosaur," they go for more spare beats. Like playing bones. Not much meat on it. It also sounds like it was made for some kid artist from the early 90's. So I don't expect it will be a single. In fact, I haven't heard anything this daring from a beat-heavy act since Lords of Acid's slightly less inspired but equally whacked "I Like It." But these lyrics are bound to make it a classic freak tune. Other than being able to name-off every popular stereotype of old people, she sounds so hateful and ridiculous that I don't wonder if maybe the guy hitting on her is only 32 or there abouts.

Another one of the 5 good songs that I would remove from this to put on a better album - one with a hopefully more consistent attitude - is the almost kinky "Boots & Boys." Almost, because it doesn't find a way to put her two self-described "obsession"s together. They actually are separate here. And she uses them to make herself look "pretty." Boring. But it's only a short 2-minute thing. This girl really is brainless, isn't she? She has a crisis between ignoring the substantial stuff she sings about on some songs and getting other people to recognize it on others. And this is where "TiK ToK" fits into the picture. Because there's no crisis on that song. She can't be bothered to care one up. She knows she's got the beat to get people to pay attention to her, so on tracks like this- she throws out the person she was on the songs when she did care about substance. So whether you see this album from the view of substance or garbage, it's not consistent. Lady Gaga has a far greater cohesion of themes and means what she says to apply to more than just the moment in which she says it. I think Ke$ha just wants attention.

<center>Image Image</center>

_________________
Image
4 Disney Atmosphere Images


Last edited by Lazario on Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:01 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:44 pm 
Offline
Limited Edition
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:41 pm
Posts: 1448
Location: U.S.A.
I'm sick of all the crap on the radio, so I've been listening to tons of albums and getting into tons of music that was hot 10ish years ago, when I was too young to appreciate it.

I started a blog, reviewing some of the albums I've been listening to, as I listen to them. It's got mostly old albums from the '90s and early '00s, but there's some newer ones in there. So far I've got J.Lo, Janet Jackson, Macy Gray, Britney Spears, Lady Gaga, Ke$ha, and Slash.

I'm just getting started, and post at least 2 new reviews each day, so check daily.

http://amateuralbumreviews.blogspot.com/

_________________
UDer #3495 :D


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:19 am 
Offline
Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:35 am
Posts: 8296
Location: Shock and Awe Gender: Freakazoid
That's a very professional looking blog. :thumb:

_________________
Image
4 Disney Atmosphere Images


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:14 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 3:43 pm
Posts: 4553
Location: USA
AWESOME blog, Ryan! We obviously have a lot of common interests, so I'll hopefully find out about some great CDs!

Bookmarked!

Also, once I get the last Alanis CD, I plan to review each one in this thread. :)

_________________
Image

http://teendramaforum.proboards.com/
http://twitter.com/clemxens


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2010 2:33 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 3:43 pm
Posts: 4553
Location: USA
She & Him – Volume One


She & Him, comprised of Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward, are a throwback to 50’s pop, with a little bit of other sounds from other decades thrown into the mix. The reviews were abnormally positive, with Rolling Stone and Spin Magazine giving it three and a half stars out of five. It currently holds a 4 out of 5 rating on AllMusic.com. Their first album, Volume One, was released in 2008, and of all places I first heard it in American Eagle. I was a fan of Zooey Deschanel’s acting, and I liked her song in Elf, so I seeked out the rest of her music, and stumbled upon this gem.

1. Sentimental Heart (2:36) – The opening track starts with Zooey singing sweetly about a boy breaking her “sentimental” heart. The lyrics here are mediocre, with the line “What can you do with a sentimental heart?” being repeated often. The chorus has background vocals, which one can assumed be sung by Zooey, that really add to the feel of the song, one that will carry through to the rest of the album. Towards the end, with about thirty seconds left, a symbol leads into Zooey “oohing” and “aahing”.

2. Why Do You Let Me Stay Here? (2:31) – This song, like the one previous, has the definite 50’s feel, but also throws in a bit of a country vibe. The guitars twang, provided by M. Ward, flows very well with Zooey’s soft voice, leading to an awesome combination and an awesome track. This was also the only single off the album.

3. This Is Not A Test (3:31) – So far this is the slowest song on the album, but not quite a ballad. Zooey does some strange things with her voice on this track, thus leading herself to struggle a bit with the high notes, and going too deep with the low notes. It somehow works to her benefit, and while this song is definitely not the best, it’s certainly not the worst, either. M. Ward provides background vocals.

4. Change Is Hard (3:03) – This song almost has a blues-y vibe going for it. Zooey’s vocals lead one to a lounge-type setting, with Zooey up on stage, swaying back and forth in front of the microphone. Not exactly different from the previous songs, but one of the better. Zooey has a great sound on this track, and Ward’s instruments are a great addition, as always. The lyrics, as the title does, suggest that “change is hard”, and Zooey’s composition relates to the majority’s feeling about change… and that it’s hard.

5. I Thought I Saw Your Face Today (2:50) – A laid-back song, the instruments seem to take a break and quiet down, leaving Zooey’s singing to take the lead. Her voice is very sensual on the track, almost enticing the listener to her. A good song.

6. Take it Back (2:37) – The slowest song on the album has Zooey talking about having her lover take his love back, because she doesn’t want, nor need, it anymore. There’s an obvious emotional tone in Zooey’s song, which leads to the assumption that this song was based on a personal experience that is still affecting her.

7. I Was Made For You (2:31) – Taking a break from the slower songs, Zooey and M. speed things up a little. The lyrics in this song are very basic and a little too sweet, honestly… yet it works very well. This song is a favorite in large part to the instrumentals. Zooey’s voice attempts to riff a little too much, and it only works a few of the many times.

8. You Really Got A Hold On Me (3:59) – This song, popularized by The Beatles, was originally written in 1962 and performed by The Miracles. It’s the longest track off the album, and one of the best. M. Ward’s sings actual words for the first time, and it really blends well with Zooey’s vocals, leading to a sweet semi-duet.

9. Black Hole (2:12) – After track 8, track 9 seems to be a different album, since the two have such different feels. Zooey spins lyrics out of her mouth while Ward continues the same few chords. A great song.

10. Got Me (2:46) – Like track 7, this song is a little too cheesy, but again, it works for sweet-natured Zooey. The chorus is a bit catchy, but overall the song is my least favorite on the album. It’s also got a little of the country twang some of the previous songs had.

11. I Should Have Known Better (3:39) – Another Beatles cover, this song was written in 1964 by John Lennon and Paul McCartney for the album “A Hard Day’s Night.” The Beach Boys also did a fairly popular cover in 1965. The song is jazzed up for She & Him, with a little bit of other genres mixed in as well. Zooey Deschanel changes the lyrics so they fit gender. It seems M. Ward only sings on songs that are being covered, since he provides a lot of vocals here. The Beatle’s version is better, but this one is good enough too.

12. Sweet Darlin’ (2:41) – This song was written by Zooey Deschanel and actor Jason Schwartzman. It’s the catchiest track off the album, and one of my favorites. The lyrics seem to pop and the beats get faster as the song goes on.

13. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (1:37) – The shortest song on the album is also another cover. It’s slow, soft, and honestly makes me a little sleepy. It’s a traditional Negro spiritual song and was added to National Recording Registry in 2002. It’s just Zooey on this track, and the reasons behind why she chose to sang it are unknown. It’s one of the most covered songs in the history of the music industry, and Deschanel shortens it a little bit, but still leaves you filled.

Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward really made a fantastic debut album for the ages, and is hard to believe that their music can be improved upon. It is, surprisingly, in their next album, aptly titled “Volume Two”, which I will be reviewing soon.

_________________
Image

http://teendramaforum.proboards.com/
http://twitter.com/clemxens


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 7:05 pm 
Offline
Collector's Edition
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:18 pm
Posts: 692
Location: USA
Ashley Tisdale's Guilty Pleasure Album

Image

Probably by now everyone know who is Ashley Tisdale. This review is from her 2nd album Guilty Pleasure.

1. Acting Out (10/10)- A great opening to the CD. It start with the sounds of an orchestra like a beginning of a show then the songs goes to Pop/Rock.

2. It's Alright, It's OK (9/10)- The 1st single of the album.

3. Masquerade (9/10)- It involves a lot of rock elements another good song.

4. Overrated (7/10)- An alright song but not the best.

5. Hot Mess (10/10)- A really catchy song.

6. How Do You Love Someone (7.5/10)- An alright song.

7. Tell Me Lies (10/10)- Another awesome song.

8. What If (5/10)- The song is too slow.

9. Erase and Rewind (10/10)- Awesome song.

10. Hair (6/10)- The beat is really good but the song is strange.

11. Delete You (7.5)- An alright song.

12. Me Without You (7/10)- Too slow.

13. Crank It Up (10/10)- The 2nd single but only in Europe. The best song from the whole album it's catchy and very enjoyable to listen too.

14. Switch (9/10)- Another good song.

AshleyTisdale.com

Image

If you buy Guilty Pleasure on AshleyTisdale.com you get 2 bonus tracks, photo book and posters.

15. I'm Back (10/10)- Awesome song.
16. Watcha Waiting For (10/10)- Awesome song.

iTunes

If you buy Guilty Pleasure on iTunes you get a bonus track.

15. Blame It On The Beat (10/10)- Awesome song.

Guilty Pleasure: Target Exclusive [CD/DVD]

If you buy Guilty Pleasure on Target you get a bonus DVD featuring 30 minutes of making of the album and "It's Alright, It's OK" music video. The cover art is a little darker than the standard edition.

Walmart and Walmart.com

If you buy Guilty Pleasure you get 2 remixes of "It's Alright, It's OK".

Other Songs

This 2 songs didn't make it on the album here on the U.S. and the other one song was for pre-order if you order it on AshleyTisdale.com.

Time's Up (10/10) [Pre-order]- Awesome song.

Guilty Pleasure (10/10) [Japan Edition of Guilty Pleasure]- Awesome song.

If My Life Was A Movie (10/10) [Unreleased Track]- Awesome song.

You can hear all the bonus tracks on youtube.

Well, I give this album 8/10 but if the all the bonus tracks were included on the album I'll give it 10/10. Ashley Tisdale did improve from her previous album Headstrong.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 8:36 pm 
Offline
Platinum Edition
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 9:54 am
Posts: 10414
Location: USA
Great blog, Ryan!!!

Everyone has their own tastes, which is a good thing; I bought Guilty Pleasure when it came out, but then I sold it, and didn't rebuy it (versus other albums I had sold and rebought)..I must prefered Headstrong...although "It's Alright, It's OK" is a great song.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 10:47 pm 
Offline
Limited Edition
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 8:55 pm
Posts: 1041
Image

Judy Garland's career was full of soaring highs and crushing lows. This concert is arguably the biggest high point of her career. Less than a decade later, Judy would be gone - killed by an accidental overdose of the pills she'd been dependent on since adolescence.

That fate had almost befallen her just two years before this concert. In 1959, Judy, extremely overweight and overly dependent on pills and alcohol, had nearly died from hepatitis and was told she'd be a semi-invalid for the rest of her life and that she'd never work again. She wasn't about to lay down and die though. Instead, she whipped herself back into shape and on April 23, 1961, Judy was back and better than ever.

And that night, Capitol Records recorded her performance, which according to the liner notes of the 2001 CD reissue was attended by, among many others, Rock Hudson, Richard Burton, Spencer Tracy, Myrna Loy, Henry Fonda, Carol Channing, and Julie Andrews. For over two hours, Judy pranced around on stage, singing her heart out, telling amusing stories, and gave one of the most legendary concerts in the history of recorded music. The resulting double album, released just two and a half months later, was an instant best-seller, spending nearly two years on the Billboard charts, spending a total of 13 weeks at #1, going Gold almost immediately, and becoming the first album by a female artist and the first live album to win the Grammy for Album Of The Year. Her performances of several classic songs are considered to be the definitive performances of those songs.

To do a track-by-track review of this album would really be a major disservice. It's meant to be enjoyed from beginning to end as an experience. However, there's definitely some highlights, which I'll get to in a minute.

Judy Garland's voice had never been this fantastic before this concert, and it'd never be quite this fantastic again, although the 1960 London sessions, which were mostly unreleased for many years but are now available on a beautifully remastered CD, come quite close. She was older now, her voice had more depth and range than she'd had in her childhood, and it had some very minor signs of wear that added to the resonance of her performances, but hadn't yet been completely worn out. And if you have either the 2000 24K Gold CD from DCC Classics or the 2001 CD from Capitol, you will also hear what an incredible storyteller she was, often stretching the truth or even flat-out making up details for a laugh.

Judy performs many of her classics here - The Man That Got Away, Over The Rainbow, Zing! Went The Strings Of My Heart, The Trolley Song, Swanee, Rock-A-Bye Your Baby, You Made Me Love You, with many regarding these performances as the definitive versions of these classics. She also performed some newer songs she'd never performed before, such as Alone Together, Puttin' On The Ritz, How Long Has This Been Going On, and more.

If you want to know why Judy Garland is still considered as one of the greatest female vocalists who ever lived, pick up this album. She's in absolutely fantastic voice here, she's energetic, she's funny, and it's absolutely a joy to listen to from beginning to end.

Highlights:
Almost Like Being In Love/This Can't Be Love - A joyously happy number. On the 2001 CD, this track also contains a hilarious story about Judy trying a new look after the song is over.
You Go To My Head - Judy forgets one of the lines here but never misses a beat and manages a little self-depricating humor.
Alone Together - A beautifully haunting song that showcases both an intimate restrained delivery and then shows what a powerhouse she could be.
Puttin' On The Ritz - Half of the previous track on the 2001 CD is a cute little intro about the song being a striptease, which then segues into the song.
The Man That Got Away - Possibly the best performance she ever gave of this classic from A Star Is Born.
Zing! Went The Strings Of My Heart - A Judy standard given its best performance here.
You Made Me Love You/For Me And My Gal/The Trolley Song - Three of her all-time MGM classics, this medley was a staple in her shows from her first shows at the Palace in the early 50's. Given its best here.
Over The Rainbow - Considered by most Judy fans to be the best recording ever made by any vocalist of this song. Absolutely breathtaking.

But really, this album was meant to be enjoyed from beginning to end, without skipping songs. Every performance is of such fantastic musical and vocal quality that you don't want to skip or miss a single second of it, and you may even find yourself wanting to listen to it again immediately after it ends - do so. It's fun.

ETA: Judy should not get the full credit for this brilliant concert recording. Mort Lindsey and his orchestra deserve an equal share of the credit. His arrangements allow Judy and the songs to shine like never before. Capitol also deserves credit for having the smarts to record this concert for posterity, and for their 24-bit remastering in 2001. The sound quality of that CD release is absolutely stellar.

_________________
Image
-Joey


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 6:54 pm 
Offline
Collector's Edition
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:18 pm
Posts: 692
Location: USA
Shakira's She Wolf Album

Image

Since 2005 Shakira hasn't made an album until in 2009 with She Wolf. With this album Shakira went for more Pop, Dance, Electo sounds instead of the old typical Shakira sounds but this album is still good. What makes Shakira so special is that she always like to try different things with her music.

Some standard edition has only 10 Tracks while other has 13 Tracks.

1. She Wolf (10/10) (The 1st single of the album.)

2. Did It Again (Feat. Kid Cudi) (1/10) (Hate this remix. The original version is way better.)

3. Long Time (9/10) (Great Song)

4. Why Wait (10/10) (Awesome Song)

5. Good Stuff (9.5/10) (Great Song)

6. Men In This Town (10/10) (This should be the next single after Gypsy.)

7. Gypsy (10/10) (The 3rd single release international. The only slowest track from the whole album but it has a nice beat.)

8. Spy (Feat. Wyclef Jean) (8.5/10) (My least favorite song from the whole album but it still a good song.)

9. Mon Amour (10/10) (This track reminds me of Shakira older work.)

10. Loba ("She Wolf" Spanish Version) (10/10)

11. Lo Hecho Está Hecho ("Did It Again" Spanish Version) (10/10)

12. Años Luz ("Why Wait" Spanish Version) (10/10)

13. Give It Up To Me (Feat. Lil' Wayne) (10/10) (The 2nd Single only in the US and Canada.)

iTunes and Target Exclusive (CD/DVD)

Image

This exclusive includes all 13 tracks from the standard edition. Track 2 gets replace by "Did It Again" the original version while "Did It Again (Feat. Kid Cudi)" is track number 14.

2. Did It Again (10/10) (The 2nd single release outside from the US and Canada. This is the awesome version not with Kid Cudi.)

14. Did It Again (Feat. Kid Cudi) (1/10)

15. Gypsy (Live) (10/10)

16. She Wolf (Live) (10/10)

DVD
Gypsy (Live Performance)
Why Wait (Live Performance)
The Making of She Wolf Music Video
She Wolf (Music Video)

Overall I give this album (10/10). But I wish that this album had more new songs instead of a Remix, Spanish songs, and live performance, even though I like the Spanish songs and live performance. I really recommend the iTunes and Target Edition.

Be on the lookout for The Sun Comes Out World Tour and her new single "Loca" (English Version) (Feat. Dizzee Rascal). Her new album The Sun Comes Out will be released on October 19, 2010.


Last edited by AladdinFan on Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:18 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 8:51 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:35 pm
Posts: 4749
Location: The Netherlands
Image

Bob Dylan- Bringing It All Back Home (1965)

Blonde on Blonde (1966) is the most praised Dylan album ever? Maybe, but fantastic as that double-album is, it doesn't have the mix of electric and acoustic songs that makes BIABH so unique in the huge Dylan catalogue. It opens with an electric 'side', which was quite a shock to the old fans who loved Dylan for his folk music. But the artist didn't want to be confined to the label of 'protest singer' all of his life, and he decided to expand his musical horizon. Some of his fans turned their backs on him in anger, but at the same time Dylan reached a new public consisting of millions of fans. Single-handedly he invented a new genre in pop music, dubbed 'folk rock', which combined the rock 'n' roll music with his clever, deep and meaningful lyrics. Poetry meets rocks: it was never done before. At the same time, he pleased his fans with an acoustic 'side B'.

The result is outstanding. After exactly 45 years, the album still stands strong. There's not a single weak track on it. It begins with 'Subterrenean Homesick Blues', which everybody knows because it's essentially the first "rap" song ever, and in D.A. Pennebaker's legendary film Don't look back (1967) it got accompanied by the world's very first "video clip". But enough about the historical context... How does it *sound*? In one word: amazing. It's a unique trip. You put it on and it won't let you go. It really captures Dylan's relief of having broken out of the 'protest singer-mold'. You can actually hear him flourish on this album. He combines beautiful, heart-wrenching lyrics with chilling musical compositions, but he never falls into clichés. He manages to make 'little' songs, like 'Love Minus Zero/No Limit' and 'She Belongs To Me', sound so big and important. If you hear what he's singing, you stand in awe at the creativity with which he crafted the songs. It's his voice and the way he uses it, his timing and phrasing, that give them their definitive touch.

It's also a very energetic album. In a lot of songs, Dylan uses every instrument that's possible to create the fullest possible sound. The result is so convincing and catchy, that you almost forget to pay attention to the absurd lyrics, that in some strange way make perfect sense at the same time. "Well I wake up in the morning/ There's frogs inside my socks/ Your momma, she's hiding/ Inside the ice box" are the first lines of 'On The Road Again'. Is it nonsense? Then why do the closing lines of each verse make so much sense? "And you ask why I don't live here/ Honey, how come you don't move?" It's a song about not any longer belonging to a certain place in time and the fact that others don't understand. Like a lot of songs on this album ('Maggie's Farm' comes to mind) it can be seen as a farewell to the folk scene. But it's the way Dylan pronounces "honey" each time that gives you goosebumps. How such a little word can come to mean so much by the way it's sung... it's incredible.

'Bob Dylan's 115th Dream' is written like a real dream. Everybody will recognize the structure and strange patterns of a dream. But it's wonderful how Dylan has captured that feeling exactly. I have listened to this song at least a 100 times, and I'm still taken aback by the enormous amount of creativity that went into these lyrics. I can't for the life of me figure out how anybody could ever come up with a song like this. I like the laughing at the beginning, it always gets me laughing, too.

Then there's the acoustic side. That opens with 'Mr. Tambourine Man', which is a huge public favorite. A man, a guitar, a harmonica and lyrics that can only be described as magical: what more do you need? It takes the listener upon a magical trip. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that Dylan was "tripping" too, when he wrote this classic masterpiece. It really drags you along into a dream-like world --in a whole other way than 'Bob Dylan's 115th Dream'. It's a perfect song to relax to. 'Gates of Eden' and 'It's Allright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)' have become legendary in their own right. From the latter song comes the memorable line: "And if my thought-dreams could be seen/They'd probably put my head into a guillotine".

It ends with 'It's All Over Now, Baby Blue', which has an opening that seems similar to the earlier 'Love Minus Zero/No Limit', but quickly turns into a whole new song. There's no better way to end this album than this song, which is really dependant on Dylan's voice: his timing, his phrasing and most of all his intonation *make* this song. He has a way to touch you with his voice that no other artist has. Because his voice is not perfect. Because he doesn't have a 'pretty' voice. Some people say he has an ugly voice. But he knows how to use it, and he can sing *everything* with it and still be convincing and moving and touching. And that's what he does in this song.

The song was featured in D.A. Pennebaker's begind-the-scenes documentary Don't look back, about Dylan's last tour as an acoustic performer. He performs the song for Donovan and other guests in his hotel room. A nice way to end this review. It starts from 2:20 on in this clip. Notice the vast difference between Donovan and Dylan, and notice how Donovan looks as Dylan is playing. It's like he's realizing at that moment that he will never be able to reach that level:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/iID1vKgBUzQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/iID1vKgBUzQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:54 pm 
Offline
Walt Disney Treasure
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2005 5:11 pm
Posts: 2236
Location: Arizona
*bump* I wrote out a whole huge review for the newest Santana CD (Not that anyone cares, really) but I figured I would share:

Whole Lotta Love (Chris Cornell/Led Zep) - I wouldn't rate this song any better than okay. It's certainly not the worst song on the album though. Cornell is certainly not Robert Plant by any stretch of the imagination. Lacks the raw power and sexuality of the Zeppelin version. 3/5.

Can't You Hear Me Knockin' (Scott Weiland/Rolling Stones) - Now this is more like it. One of my favorites on the album. Weiland surprised me with a plus vocal and Santana doing Keith Richards dirty bluesy riffs is awesome. Great great tone. 5/5.

Sunshine of Your Love (Rob Thomas/Cream) - Rob Thomas is Santana's go to guy. Pretty hard to argue with the pairing, all the stuff they've done together is pretty good, and this really isn't an exception. Thomas doesn't really hold up to Bruce/Clapton's vocal, and it lacks Clapton's irreplaceable tone from the original. The extra percussion is really annoying though. I wish they wouldn't have used it. 4/5.

While My Guitar Gently Weeps (india.arie & Yo-Yo Ma [THE CELLIST]/The Beatles - I didn't really care for this song. It just didn't do anything for me. It's a softly picked acoustic/cello duet thingy. It would make for nice elevator music I guess. 3/5.

Photograph (Daughtry/Def Leppard) - I don't care much for Def Lep (post-High 'n' Dry anyways), so it's hard for me to comment about the vocals being good or bad. It wasn't terrible. Santana absolutely BEASTS the solo though. Extra points for that. 3.5/5.

Back in Black (Nas [THE RAPPER] & Janelle Monae/AC/DC) - It's really hard for me to find anything to praise in this song. It was an interesting experiment I guess. But Nas doing the vocals is awful, and Santana can't conjure up the heaviness that the riff requires. DUD.

Riders on the Storm (Chester Bennington & Ray Manzarek/ The Doors) - Honestly, I hate the Doors, I hate Linkin Park, and this song really does nothing for me. Bennington isn't really offensive vocally, but this isn't exactly a "guitar classic." Having the keyboardist from the Doors on there is a nice touch though. 2.5/5.

Smoke on the Water (Jacoby Shaddix/Deep Purple) - The first 15 seconds or so (right before the 2nd guitar kicks in) sounds exactly like the original version. I liked it. That part I mean. I was really prepared for the worst again, what with another one of these nu-metal jerkoffs doing the vocals, but Shaddix puts in something that was surprisingly not terrible, but not Gillan worthy either. I would have liked this one way more with no vox at all. 3/5.

Dance the Night Away (Pat Monahan/Van Halen) - Prior to about 2 minutes ago, I wouldn't have been able to tell Pat Monahan from Bridget Moynahan (Apparently Pat is the dude from Train who sings that Soul Sister song in the ball twisting upper vocal range that I'm amazed isn't only heard by dogs). I really love this Van Halen song (in my top 5) and I would say that it was a really good cover. Santana does EVH justice and Monahan does a decent enough Diamond Dave. Easily one of the better songs on the CD. 5/5.

Bang a Gong (Gavin Rossdale/T. Rex) - Another song that's not really bad. Santana doesn't find the right tone though and Rossdale doesn't come through with a shining vocal performance (he never quite gets the emotion of the original right). But it's ok. 2.5/5.

Little Wing (Joe Cocker/Jimi Hendrix) - Pretty standard guitarist stuff. Feels like everyone has their own take on this one (Derek & the Dominos, SRV). I wouldn't say this one sheds any new light on the tune, but it doesn't detract or disappoint. The vocal is Joe Cocker as solid as usual, and Santana matches it with his good, solid tone and tasteful playing. 4.5/5.

I Ain't Superstitious (Jonny Lang/Jeff Beck) - I can't really pass judgment on this one as I haven't really listened to the original (or at least the version this is supposed to be a cover of) so much. But between listening to them both, the guitar on the Santana version is good enough, but the vocal falls flat in comparison to the Beck version. 3/5.

Deluxe Edition bonus tracks:

Fortunate Son (Scott Stapp/CCR) - Santana doesn't find the right tone, Scott Stapp is a complete and total fuck up, and the song lacks ANY of the power/anger/message of the original. DUD.

Under the Bridge (Andy Vargas/Red Hot Chili Peppers) - I don't know who Andy Vargas is (Wiki article leads to some Euro footballer, which I doubt.) Liners say he did background vocals on the album. Either way, This version of this song is EXCEPTIONAL. It's awesome and a very well done cover of this song, which is pretty much out of left field. IT at least makes up for suffering through that shitty Scott Stapp song. 5/5.

On the whole, I would say it's worth at least a spin if you like some of the songs chosen. Just do yourself a favor and avoid the Nas thing and Scott Stapp too.

Total album score: 4/5


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:36 pm 
Offline
Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:35 am
Posts: 8296
Location: Shock and Awe Gender: Freakazoid
<img src="http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/dro100/o191/o19181yjyk1.jpg" width="250" height="220" border="0">

Image

The word is out... Katy Perry is "a douchebag" (as the Monday, Michael, on YouTube's 5AwesomeGays affectionately calls her). The girl is a poser and a raging hypocrite. Or... are her stupid public (internet) stunts just a way of getting attention? Who knows (cares)? The one, undeniable fact is not that she's a prime Californian hottie; it's that she makes terrible music. I mean, does anyone really think 3 good songs ("Hot 'N Cold," "Teenage Dream," "Waking Up in Vegas") equal a "force to be reckoned with" ...anywhere? Of course not, that's why she has to rely on her looks (which are stunning) to sustain a career instead of real talent. This has always been the formula to Perry's Candyland- a place where other mean celebrities like Lady Gaga are cheap and blasphemous, but she - with all her PG-13 rated debauchery - is just wonderful. She's "just one of the boys" and can kiss as many girls as she wants to. Basically- she's the underaged straight crowd's idea of a gay icon: a symbol of privilage and status over true cutting edge and soul. I guess that makes her pretty expensive (the new millennium's idea of classy) in comparison to every pop girl's competition: Gaga.

<center>Image</center>
So, if you've only heard one song from this awful follow-up to One of the Boys, you might be surprised to know that maybe only 2 other songs on the album are anything like her summer-'10 smash hit, "California Gurls" (a song where the lyrics really are the main flaw). The album is mostly reserved for her trademark "I Kissed a Girl" rock-pop. Only, the thing collectively has a somewhat dreamy / ethereal vibe. And most of the songs are really about her liberating herself from people she feel are holding her back, especially her 'I only attract druggies' anthem, "Circle the Drain." I guess this girl's never heard the old proverb that you are the company you keep... It's actually not always so easy pinning down exactly what's wrong about each song. Sometimes, the music just isn't very good ("The One That Got Away," "Peacock"). Several times, it's Katy's voice (loud and throaty doesn't magically equal powerful- "Firework" best proves this). Usually the lyrics are just terrible (otherwise, "E.T." could possibly have been an interesting, provocative track). And then... well, things just get freaking weird. Initially, "Who Am I Living For?" was my vote for 'song to redeem the whole album'. But... read the lyrics. The song should be called, "Who Am I?" Because this is a supreme case of identity crisis. A total image meltdown the likes of which no other pop singer would dare attempt. She alternatively begins to refer to herself (in various suggestions) as a soldier, a religious crusader, and... a tragic, tortured figure doomed to suffer some bizarre Nine Inch Nails-ian "Ruiner" type fate. Ke$ha could easily have gotten away with this (the animal references, the overly dramatic screaming- ala "Blind"). Perry has a lot more to lose. So, let's just hope for her sake that no one but her biggest fans ever read these lyrics. This is as delusional as pop music gets.

The album isn't lovely enough to fulfill the title's promise. And albums aren't exactly/usually meant to be background noise- the only value this has. Although, this could try and sell for commercial jingles with picture-perfect Britney's and Barbie's mouthing the words to "Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)" as their sleek car spins down the sunny summer roads. Though, that makes the last-week August release of this somewhat perplexing (unless they're celebrating global warming- because not that much of America is still sweltering a month and a half after school starts). "California Gurls" needs a lyrical re-write, badly, "Teenage Dream" should have just been resigned to a soundtrack rather than being an attempt to justify this album, "Peacock" has a chance to become a single (though Gwen Stefani's equally ridiculous - yet, better - "Yummy" didn't have the chance) but it's the worst song here... and that leaves us with the album closing trio of "Pearl" (Katy's best singing on the album), "Hummingbird Heartbeat" (best song after "Teenage Dream"), and the sleepy (Norah Jones-y?) "Not Like the Movies." Together almost make this a tribute to retro styles. Pretty, but if the best moment is "Hummingbird," it's worth noting that Goldfrapp's "Rocket" got here first.

<center><img src="http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff64/Moviefanphotoplace/TV/KatyPerry4.jpg" width="650" height="350" border="0"></center>
The reason Katy Perry is such an unlikable pop star is that her fantasies are so poorly constructed. If this album is an attempt to get serious... Lily Allen beat her by over a year and a half (and her anti-drug anthem, "Everyone's At It," is not only more socially relevant, but just a lot damn better) and always had a smart "nothing is what it seems" message behind all her music. Not to mention, for all her posing- her buddy Ke$ha is a lot better at being frivolous, "Peacock" could never out-rageous "My Humps," and... some have compared her voice to Alanis Morissette. I don't think there's a fan of Perry's in the world who would argue that she's any match for Alanis (though it wouldn't surprise me if they tried). Katy's music is all money and her passion and ability to be genuine is, at the best of times, questionable. Who honestly takes messages of empowerment ("Pearl," "Firework") or reality ("Not Like the Movies") or holiness from a girl with boobs that spurt foam? It's time for Perry to "Kiss" off.

<center>Image</center>

_________________
Image
4 Disney Atmosphere Images


Last edited by Lazario on Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:43 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 3:15 pm 
Offline
Limited Edition
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:41 pm
Posts: 1448
Location: U.S.A.
Hey guys! I've been crazy busy for the past 6 or 7 months, and have had barely any time to keep up with my review blog! However, I was recently able to get on and review Ke$ha's Cannibal EP and Britney Spears' new album Femme Fatale, so check them out! http://amateuralbumreviews.blogspot.com/ :)

_________________
UDer #3495 :D


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 5:59 pm 
Offline
Platinum Edition
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 1:05 pm
Posts: 5474
Location: Wichita, Kansas
Note to Lazario:

You forgot to mention that 'douche bag Katy Perry' is also married to another big douche bag, Russell Brand, probably the worst actor to be foisted on the American Public, who stars in the horrible remake of "Arthur" that hits theaters tomorrow (April 8th).

_________________
The only way to watch movies - Original Aspect Ratio!!!!
I LOVE my Blu-Ray Disc Player!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:42 pm 
Offline
Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:35 am
Posts: 8296
Location: Shock and Awe Gender: Freakazoid
dvdjunkie wrote:
Note to Lazario:

You forgot to mention that 'douche bag Katy Perry' is also married to another big douche bag, Russell Brand, probably the worst actor to be foisted on the American Public, who stars in the horrible remake of "Arthur" that hits theaters tomorrow (April 8th).

I try to stay out of their personal lives. :D


Image

Okay, so I finally decided to pull up a chair and listen to it. Here's what I think (as I'm hearing it for the first time):

When I finally got to track #3, "Inside Out," the first thought that occured to me is: wow, is this album dense. It's like everyone in the producing booth has a serious cold or something. It's like being rolled around in a fog machine. I like acid beats and hazy dance tracks, but this is ridiculous. In fact, dense is compacted. This is downright clogged.

Tracks

1. "Till the World Ends" - Image
Clearly a knockoff of Ke$ha's "Blow." This is made all the more obvious by the fact that... well, she co-wrote it. She must have been trying to sabotage Britney because, even though it's become a hit, it's a bad song. Especially the "wooah-ooah" sections.

2. "Hold It Against Me" - Image
It's okay. Barely rises above the thick smoke and stereo coughing of track 1 but it has a decent chorus.

3. "Inside Out" - Image
More conjestion in the mix. But... it's the best track so far. Okay chorus and the verses are good too. I love the opening trickling effect.

4. "I Wanna Go" - Image
More Ke$ha mugging. But, it actually works. Best track on the album (standard version).

5. "How I Roll" - Image
Too goofy. Gwen Stefani might've been able to make something of this. Actually, this sounds more up Robyn's alley. But Britney? I don't think so.

6. "(Drop Dead) Beautiful" - Image
I'm not surprised that Britney sings about catching the flu in this song, that's what she sounds like. I've heard better-sounding robots.

7. "Seal It with a Kiss" - Image
I'm not going to lie, I kind of like this one. It's poorly produced, but I can hear where it could have worked.

8. "Big Fat Bass" - Image
Has a leg up on a good amount of the other tracks this far in, but it's insanely repetitive and isn't that great anyway- so... why repeat what isn't great?

9. "Trouble for Me" - Image
Boring, generic, and of course Britney's voice doesn't deliver. Even the distortion sound effect does nothing for the song.

10. "Trip to Your Heart" - Image
GOD, this began SO promisingly!! I was so into this for the first 20-25 seconds... then Britney had to start singing. It's not just her voice, it's the tone where she's singing. She brings the song down from the sky, where Blackout's "Heaven on Earth" proved she can soar with the eagles when she wants to, down to the swamp. A lousy "love" song. Huge disappointment.

11. "Gasoline" - Image
This one's interesting. The production / beats actually don't completely drown out her funk. It is funky. Not bad. Well, it still doesn't go very far. Needs a next level.

12. "Criminal" - Image
I also kind of like this one. It almost crosses the line into quite-good-ness. But again Britney can't sing at all and the chorus needs a real singer.

Deluxe Bonus Tracks

13. "Up N' Down" - Image
Oooh... This is working! Britney's voice is even improving. Slightly.

14. "He About to Lose Me" - Image
Another goofy one. But the production is still better than the main album. Even though Britney's voice is pretty weird, I still like her better here.

15. "Selfish" - Image
Compared to "Up N' Down," this is kinda boring. At the start. But that changes. It's very well produced. And the rocky KICK at around 2 minutes in is great!

16. "Don't Keep Me Waiting" - Image
WOW! She & company decided to take the rock kick in "Selfish" and mix it with the distortion of "Trouble for Me" and use them to make a challenging, risk-taking track. This is like cocaine for the brain. It's kind of a bad tune but it's highly enjoyable. She attacks this thing with full abandon! That's the kind of Britney I want to see / hear from.


Wow, I cannot believe this album has a chance to try to copy another artist and... Britney chooses Ke$ha rather than Lady Gaga. Seriously, this album has serious Ke$ha-envy and guess who has more personality, who's a more fun listen? Not Britney. You'd have to be pretty clueless to think this album works. Sorry, Britney fans and fanatics- this album bites. Especially since Blackout was excellent and I was equally surprised by Circus. However, the Deluxe bonus tracks are surprisingly effective if Britney really wants to borrow Ke$ha's thunder.

Overall Album Rating
Standard 12-track Version: Image
Deluxe 16-track Version: Image

Tracks Worth Purchasing (via-Digital Music Downloads):
"I Wanna Go"
"Up N' Down"

Tracks to Consider Purchasing
"Hold It Against Me"
"Inside Out"
"Selfish"
"Don't Keep Me Waiting"

Tracks I Will Be Purchasing / Final Recommendations (& Listen Links)
"I Wanna Go" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F94hVx3cw88
"Up N' Down" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TiJSqNQrCI
"Don't Keep Me Waiting" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkhcusvMt9Q


And... what the hell, lemme check out:

0. "3" - Image
Should have been on the album. Just for the hell of it.

_________________
Image
4 Disney Atmosphere Images


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:39 pm 
Offline
Platinum Edition

Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2006 10:44 am
Posts: 6153
Location: Michigan
ALPOCALYPSE
WEIRD AL YANKOVIC
VOLCANO RECORDS

Alpocalypse is kind of middle of the road as far as parody CDs go. It's not Weird Al's best work, but it's not his worst either. Some songs like Perform This Way (A take on Lady Gaga) and Whatever You Like are enjoyable while others like are just bland. I guess that is true for all Weird Al's albums though.

3.5/5

_________________
My Blu-Ray Collection


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 11:52 pm 
Offline
Platinum Edition
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2005 12:26 pm
Posts: 6685
Location: North Carolina Gender: Male
Lazario wrote:
"Hummingbird Heartbeat" (best song after "Teenage Dream")
I know I'm way behind, but I felt entirely the same way about that one. "Teenage Dream" is the only reason I got my sister to get a copy of the ablum from a friend, and "Hummingbird" was the only other song that I really enjoyed from it. The rest is kind of a waste.

I'd be interested to see your thoughts on Born This Way (if you ever have the time). I've recently re-surged back into that album.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:41 am 
Offline
Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:35 am
Posts: 8296
Location: Shock and Awe Gender: Freakazoid
Image

Tracks

1. "Marry the Night" - Image
This song starts a lot of the album's later themes of freedom through bar-hopping, self-expression through "rebel" fashion, and one-night-to-live recklessness = you know you're alive. I used to think it was the best but "Unicorn" presents amazing competition. This might be the better lyrically, though. With lines like "I'm a winner," then later, "I'm a loser"; if it's meant to be unapologetic and emancipating, it feels sullen and bittersweet. But it's a good transformer: it becomes livelier in the last 90 seconds and ends in a blaze of glory.

2. "Born This Way" - Image
This song works a lot better as a follow-up to "Marry the Night," as a track to further the album sonically, rather than thematically. I remained an ardent disbeliever in the song's power up until the moment the album was released on May 23rd of this year. I mean, let's face it: the lyrics are a joke. Or, to be more accurate, they have greater relevance to a person's self-important delusions of being great because they were born rather than to a generation of victims of vicious intolerance because of the way they were born. Their skin color, sexual orientation, gender, etc. The superstar comparison really ruins it. Even though it aims to be the all-time anthem of acceptance, it's a drama queen song (and, GOD, the last thing we need is a new "Believe"). But that's thematically. Sonically, it's the millipede that burrows its' way into your ear and won't get out. Or, barring that, it comes to have superior meaning later. In moments where you didn't expect it to, it can provide great inspiration. Even if it is a drama song, it's a pretty good one. I admit- this one's kind of confusing.

3. "Government Hooker" - Image
The album's clear breakneck slut anthem. The lyrics' pollution of the theme of politicians being whores with the pretentious inclusion of JFK idolatry is the only flaw. Otherwise, it's a hot and scary mess. Full-force, passionate yet frozen, hardcore minded. A powerful achievement. If this isn't a single, the Haus of Gaga are out of their blasted heads. I'd kill to see what the video would look like!

4. "Judas" - Image
As my comments on the last song probably indicate, I'm not very Keen on Gaga trying to conjure images of famous celebrities and biblical figures directly into a song's lyrics. It feels cheap and pretentious, like justification for wacky lines like "Judas kiss me if offensed or wear ear condom next time." In fact, she almost ruined the otherwise perfect "Dance in the Dark" from The Fame Monster with that unbelievably painful compilation of dead tragic female figures (oh, and, Liberace- why was he included?). It didn't feel natural or appropriate, it felt badly forced. Her more interesting messages are always implied through tone of the music's sound and imagery of the lyrics themselves. This one's an incredible thunder-on-the-mountain romp with the momentum of a wildly swung, king-sized sledgehammer that really is different from "Bad Romance." Mostly in its' pounding, stomping boot-wrapped toes. The biker-themed video wasn't a mistake, this frosty track has spark plugs hooked up to it.

5. "Americano" - Image
Initially, this was my vote for worst song on the album*. However, this time, the lyrics really make up for her awful wailing. I mean: this is a socio-politically charged little track!! Even the most bull-headed anti-Gaga person on UD has to admit this is a passionately pro-gay anthem. One that even manages to tap into emotions with the non-screaming portions. She's still trying to be a robot, but the music tells a different story. And her vocal performance I think reflects how I feel about the issue of gay marriage: the opponents inspire anger (and this is an angry performance on her part- which I appreciate), cynicism, and a physical sense of pointed rage. Though, I don't object to the idea of her screaming and trying to spearhead a sonic revolution within the song itself, it's incredibly trying on the ears after 2 minutes. Production-wise, this song sounds good on very few systems. So, you're forced to just go with the noise. These lyrics, however. Said it but I need to say it again: they're something else. If she confesses on another track that she serves "Jesus Christ" above everyone but her father, it means a lot for her to have to say "I don't speak your Jesus Cristo" to anyone. In that one sentence, she exposes the world's abuse of religious language for the purpose of labeling many of its' own believers as sinners for their love. The track also aims to suggest politicians are cheap for trying to limit the ability of gays to marry to "on the West Coast on a Wednesday."

6. "Hair" - Image
I don't know where I said this first but, if my hands are tied and there's a gun pressed against my forehead, I think the only reason for this song and "The Edge of Glory"s existence is to try to make the saxophone cool again. It never stopped being cool. But public taste dictated that it be left to the 80's, Lisa Simpson, and cheesy, direct-to-video action-thrillers of the early 90's. Thematically, there's more "lemme be free" screaming. And..., wow is it lame here. This could only be an empowering message for... well, the temptation is to say Angela Chase (My So-Called Life), but, I'm actually going to go with the 'angry' loner chick with blue hair in that "very special episode" of The Secret World of Alex Mack. Like many people have said about high school not being the end of the world, so I feel a learning pamphlet should probably be distributed to every fan of this song letting them know that parents' control over us doesn't last forever. Consider me biased, but I think hearing someone talking (singing) from a kids' point of view trying to rebel against their parents' controlling how they look is silly and is only relatable if you're 16 or younger. Even by 16 I'd gotten over it. If you're really free, you don't have to tell people your hair is yours and no one else's. This doesn't strike me as the song where people believe it definitively, you know?

7. "Scheiße" - Image
Killer dance song. And Gaga's singing is great.

8. "Bloody Mary" - Image
I really don't like this song. If this album has a consistent groove reminiscent of crawling insects monster-ized by some cross between Frankenstein's lightning bolt rebirth and The Tingler's brooding throb, this is the point where the turning worm inspires nausea. This is the seasickness song. And I don't enjoy vomiting or clutching my stomach. I suppose the lyrics are interesting though.

9. "Bad Kids" - Image
Fun name-dropping of and general rebelling against different derogatory labels people have been given over the decades. But I'm kinda getting tired of the album wanting us to feel dramatic or sappy about being misunderstood or prejudged. Part of the song almost seems to say "fuck you" to it but the other parts are all 'oh, if we only lived in another world'. I'm usually in the mood to kick ass, so the whiny chorus and "I'm not that typical" sections are too soft for me.

10. "Highway Unicorn (Road to Love)" - Image
Now... here's perhaps the best sappy song on the album. Even though it tries to edge itself up with declarations like "we're gonna drink until we die." And well before this point, it got pretty touching. It seems the most autobiographical for Gaga and a story through here's-what-I-did experience. Almost impossible not to love the song. Would make a great final single. Excellent drums. And Gaga's singing is powerful.

11. "Heavy Metal Lover" - Image
This song has been the most substantial polar switch in my opinions on the album over time. I aboslutely hated it the first time hearing it. On every subsequent listen, I become more convinced it's a perfect track. It's immaculately produced and has a real wondrous wasteland vibe. If only this song had existed in Hardware's time (seems tailor-made for that film).

12. "Electric Chapel" - Image
This was one of my favorites right off the bat. And I still like it. But the verses are so Madonna, especially in her singing. It feels like she's not just copying musical themes but she's trying to become her. It's sweet and well-placed on the album. But it isn't the toweringly poignant guilty-sexy secret meeting or forbidden love anthem that it almost feels like it's trying to be. Love the guitar.

13. "Yoü and I" - Image
I admit it's good. But... what can I say? I thought "Brown Eyes" was better as an album-tilting last-call weird-love song saluting the glory of drunken poeticism. This one has just become way too hyped when you can pretty much tell no other artist could have made this song a hit. Downhome drinking at neighborhood bars just isn't that pop / club right now (is it making a comeback?). So, yeah thank the loyal fanbase for being open-minded enough to follow her anywhere. But for Gaga's reputation, the last thing we need is everyone else thinking is that she's trying to be Bruce Springsteen or something (yes, I'm actually talking about the music and not the male counterpart character she created for herself). Just like I think in "Born This Way," Gaga isn't the kind of artist we should have emancipating listeners through stories of a mother putting makeup on her kid, I don't think she's the artist to bring back the we're-all-united-through-a-shared-round-of-drinks thing without some serious thought behind it. This song kind of feels like she's saying if she stomps loud enough and sings like a lioness that will make everyone believe she can pull this off without having to think about it. This just isn't the right direction for her. At least not as is. The lyrics don't feel like they mean anything, they raise more questions than answers. Which is only a problem because the tone of the song is celebratory. Start stripping away the layers of production pizazz and I think you'll find something hollow at the core of this song. I don't believe it's anywhere near as soulful as it does.

14. "The Edge of Glory" - Image
Yeah, I've heard the stories of where this song came from. Too bad for me, since I very seldomly have that much insight into the events inspiring a song's creation. However, I don't like this one. It feels like a retread of "Highway Unicorn (Road to Love)," attempting to be springier and poppier. Then the only real passion is coming from the saxophone. The chorus and, especially, the "with you-with you-with you (...)"s are nice but the beat is mostly boring and the weird machine blip breathing is stupid. However, I did like the little Reading Rainbow influence they stuck in there in the last couple minutes.

* Actually, that's not true. First it was "Heavy Metal Lover," now it's easily "Bloody Mary."


Again, cynics of Gaga have to give her some credit: she really cares about people. Name one other popstar who has actually taken their supposed message of declaring independence through both subversion and listen-up(!!) calls to the degree she has. Christina Aguilera, Ke$ha, and even En Vogue in comparison merely flirted with making waves in the freedom of musical speech department. Lady Gaga may copy other artists but she's still a revolutionary of concept and themes. It's a sleek bulldozer of an album but it does get weighed down several times. But this is also by far, her most challenging work to date. Even I can't swallow all of this without choking a little.

Overall Album Rating
Standard 14-track Version: Image

Tracks Worth Purchasing (via-Digital Music Downloads):
"Marry the Night"
"Government Hooker"
"Judas"
"Scheiße"
"Highway Unicorn (Road to Love)"

Tracks to Consider Purchasing
"Born This Way"
"Bad Kids"
"Electric Chapel"
"Yoü and I"


Disney's Divinity wrote:
Lazario wrote:
"Hummingbird Heartbeat" (best song after "Teenage Dream")
I know I'm way behind, but I felt entirely the same way about that one. "Teenage Dream" is the only reason I got my sister to get a copy of the ablum from a friend, and "Hummingbird" was the only other song that I really enjoyed from it. The rest is kind of a waste.

Forgot to say that I agree with you. I probably mentioned in my review that I really liked "Teenage Dream," but... yeah, I really liked it.

_________________
Image
4 Disney Atmosphere Images


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  

Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 63 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group